Chaka Khan, Dionne Warwick, Tina Turner Lead Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductees for 2021

L-R: Dionne Warwick, Tina Turner, Chaka Khan
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Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival; Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images; Imeh Akpanudosen/Getty Images for Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz

Four powerful women in soul music are among the nominees for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's potential class of 2021.

Chaka Khan, Dionne Warwick, Tina Turner and Mary J. Blige are among this year's 16 hopefuls, all of whom have released iconic and definitive musical works since 1995 or earlier. The nominees, announced Feb. 10, represent the most diverse slate of would-be inductees in the Hall's 35-year history, with nine of the acts comprised of people of color.

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This nomination marks Khan's seventh time for consideration, either as a member of Rufus (nominated 2012, 2018, 2019 and 2020) or on her own (2016 and 2017). Turner, a first-time nominee on her own, was inducted alongside her ex-husband Ike in 1991. Warwick and Blige appear on the ballot for the first time ever.

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As with previous years, fans can participate in a fan vote, picking their five favorites once a day through April 30. The inductees will be announced in May, with a ceremony to follow at the Cleveland, Ohio-based museum in the fall.

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The complete list of nominees are:

  • Mary J. Blige
  • Kate Bush
  • Devo
  • Foo Fighters
  • The Go-Go's
  • Iron Maiden
  • Jay-Z
  • Chaka Khan
  • Carole King
  • Fela Kuti
  • LL Cool J
  • New York Dolls
  • Rage Against the Machine
  • Todd Rundgren
  • Tina Turner
  • Dionne Warwick

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