RIP Mary Wilson of The Supremes, Dead at 76

The Supremes in 1964. L-R: Florence Ballard, Mary Wilson, Diana Ross
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David Farrell/Redferns

Mary Wilson, the co-founder and longest-lasting member of legendary Motown group The Supremes, died Feb. 8, 2021 at her home in Las Vegas. She was 76.

A cause of death was not immediately disclosed, although her publicist announced that she had passed suddenly.

Together with Diana Ross and Florence Ballard in 1959, Wilson formed a singing group in Detroit known initially as The Primettes but recognized the world over as The Supremes. Their failure to produce hit singles was something of a joke in the offices of Motown Records until Berry Gordy paired the group with the writing-production team of Brian and Eddie Holland and Lamont Dozier. Starting with "Where Did Our Love Go" in 1964, the group put a dozen singles on top of the Billboard Hot 100, including "Baby Love," "Come See About Me," "Stop! In the Name of Love," "You Can't Hurry Love" and "You Keep Me Hangin' On."

Read More: August 1964: The Supremes Charm America with "Where Did Our Love Go"

In 1967, the group was renamed Diana Ross & The Supremes, replacing Ballard with Cindy Birdsong. Ross herself exited the group for a solo career in 1970, and Wilson helped shepherd a changing line-up of the group through 1977. In the early '70s, The Supremes recorded hit singles like "Up the Ladder to the Roof," "Stoned Love" and "Floy Joy."

Read More: April 1970: The Supremes Rise To Top 10 with "Up The Ladder To The Roof"

In 1986, Wilson divulged her rocky relationship with Ross in the bestselling memoir Dreamgirl: My Life as a Supreme. An attempt to reunite the Ross-Wilson-Birdsong lineup in 1999 was unsuccessful. Wilson remained prominent as a writer (publishing three other books), musical activist, and even a contestant on Dancing with the Stars in 2019. Days before her death, she reported that she was working with Motown to make unreleased solo music of hers available for the first time.

A number of collaborators and fans have reacted to the news of her passing.

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A 1980 reworking of the legendary Doris Troy's original 1963 classic, "What'cha Gonna Do About It" featuring the popular funk band Mystic Merlin eemained unreleased for almost forty years until 2018 when SuperDiscoEdits licensed the track for release as a limited edition vinyl 12" single (now out of print). Making its digital debut via Warners/X5 with a bonus track...
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Chris Walter/WireImage
Let us count the ways.
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